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Taylor Swift Yields to Paparazzi Complaints on Her ‘1989 World Tour’

Taylor Swift has agreed to give photographers a break while shooting her performances on her 1989 World Tour.  (Photo: Getty)

Taylor Swift has agreed to give photographers a break while shooting her performances on her 1989 World Tour. (Photo: Getty)

Taylor Swift has eased restrictions on paparazzi and news organizations that want to photograph her “1989 World Tour.” The move follows a raft of complaints that Swift was trying to control the rights to photos of her and other performing acts.

The deal was announced late yesterday (July 21) by the National Press Photographers Association, which negotiated on behalf of 14 news organizations.

“After taking the time to hear our concerns regarding her world tour photography guidelines agreement, the news and professional associations and Taylor’s team are very pleased to have been able to work together for a revised agreement that is fair to everyone involved,” Mickey Osterreicher, general counsel for the Association, said in a statement.

Under the old contract, Swift’s concert staff had the right to “forcibly remove” from cameras images taken by photographers if they chose to do so. Swift also limited the use of any photos to a one-time only basis, according to the contract obtained by Poynter, a journalism web site.

As part of the deal, those restrictions have been removed and Swift’s reps have also agreed to credit photographers when Swift uses their photos for her Web site or for promotional purposes.

Even so, the contract still keeps paparazzi on a tight leash. One provision prohibits all photographs of her or opening acts performing after the second song.

The document also prohibits photographers from wondering into any area other than the designated media area “without permission and
accompaniment by management.” So, forget backstage candids.

Beside being a talented artist, Swift is a savvy businesswoman, who knows how to negotiate a deal.

Last month, she refused to allow Apple, Inc., to use her music on its new streaming site until it agreed to pay artists royalties, during a three-month, free trial period for consumers. Apple relented and changed the terms of its deal.

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