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Canadian Porn Star’s Face Launches a Thousand ‘Lonely Heart’ Scams (pics)

A Canadian soft-core porn star who goes by the name Josie Ann Miller has become a favorite of "lonely heart" scammers because of her beguiling looks. (Photo: Josie Ann Miller)

A Canadian porn star who goes by the name Josie Ann Miller has become a favorite of “lonely heart” scammers because of her beguiling looks. (Photo: Josie Ann Miller)

The face (and body) that caused hundreds, maybe even thousands of men to fall in love with her through online “lonely heart” scams, belongs to a Canadian soft-core porn actress. The model goes by the name Josie Ann Miller, but she has no connection to the scams, an IM investigation has discovered.

Miller even warns fans about them on her porn Web site.


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Nonetheless, she’s a fraudster favorite because of her beguiling looks and a proliferation of easily obtainable photos and videos online.

Josie’s site alone includes more than 24,000 photos and two dozen videos. She also does a lot of webcam or web chat work, which is perfect for scammers. They stream the video on sites like Skype to add credibility to their characters.

Josie Ann Miller: An Unwitting Sex Scam Prop
(Click Photos to Enlarge! NSFW!)
Canadian Porn Star's Face Launches a Thousand 'Lonely Heart' Scams (pics) 1Canadian Porn Star's Face Launches a Thousand 'Lonely Heart' Scams (pics) 2Canadian Porn Star's Face Launches a Thousand 'Lonely Heart' Scams (pics) 3Canadian Porn Star's Face Launches a Thousand 'Lonely Heart' Scams (pics) 4Canadian Porn Star's Face Launches a Thousand 'Lonely Heart' Scams (pics) 5Canadian Porn Star's Face Launches a Thousand 'Lonely Heart' Scams (pics) 6Canadian Porn Star's Face Launches a Thousand 'Lonely Heart' Scams (pics) 7Canadian Porn Star's Face Launches a Thousand 'Lonely Heart' Scams (pics) 8

Although her age is listed on her site as 19, some reports say she is as old as 28, 30, or even older. She may even be married with a child, according to some reports. In fact there are so many stories about her, she’s virtually mythical.

One victim claims she actually took part in the frauds while living in Africa.

“She was very young when she got into this and people make mistakes. She is not 30 years old. She does own a home in Windsor, Canada. She has been ridden hard and put up wet and wants to clean herself up,” the person wrote. “I can’t excuse what she has done to many many men but realistically I hope the best for her.”

In any case, her photos and videos appear on an untold number of dating and social media sites under several dozen different names.

Google’s social media site, Google Plus, is riddled with them. The Internet search giant did not return a call for comment nor could it be learned what steps it takes to thwart fraudsters.

Efforts to contact the real Josie were also unsuccessful.

We reached out to her and her UK modeling agency through Facebook, but we were blocked by both. She lists no contact information on her Web site.

But she is aware of the scams. She posts a warning on her Web site and urges her fans not to fall for any frauds. She does not use dating Web sites, she advises.

Even so, in her short career she is almost legendary among a small cottage industry of Web sites dedicated to unmasking online dating frauds. Indeed, it’s a big business on both sides of the fence.

Anti-scam Web sites contain a slew “testimonials” from “lonely heart” victims who have been scammed out of money, sometimes thousands of dollars, after “falling in love” with the actress.

Amazingly, for some, their affection lingers even after they’ve discovered the ruse.

“I truly wish Josie all joy and happiness,” wrote one victim. “I was almost scammed a few years ago by a person in Ghana using Josie’s pictures and videos, using the name Lilina Wendy Mood.

“He was a very smart scammer; it went on for months. I do have a feeling of affection for Josie, even though she will never know that I exist,” he added.

But it didn’t go quite so well for others.

“After chatting with her for nine months and sending her over £13,000 ($23,000) for all kinds things passport, visa and other documents she need to come the UK twice each time she made a excuse for not coming,” wrote one victim.

“I have been talking to this person for the past two and a half years, under the name Juily Addae,” wrote another victim.

“I made the mistake of sending money occasionally, including $1,000 for a plane ticket. Didn’t hear anything for a month, then she popped back on saying she was arrested for trying to use a fake ticket. Watch it, all you guys. She sounds and looks good but is out to make money off you. Another thing that got me scared is when I called her number, the voice I heard sounded like one of those Indian people who calls to harass you about bills; it is not the voice I expected from a hot white girl. Beware, STAY AWAY!

Victims, for the most part, truly are lonely people. They often end up shocked and broken-hearted once they figure out they’ve been scammed.

“So… why do we fall for all this crap? Well, some of us are extremely lonely and unable to find a partner in life by any means other than these sites; the workplace provides no prospects. It becomes easy to fall for anyone who claims to be concerned toward you,” wrote one victim.


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“I wish I had the strength to blow off this [scammer] way earlier than I did. The pain and anger is indescribable,” he added.

In Africa, scamming is widely practiced and is considered almost a part of the culture. Internet cafes are filled with mostly men, reaching out for victims. Law enforcement is negligible.

In some cases, the groups are organized and may involve a team of people. Their understanding of computer technology is usually fairly sophisticated. They sometimes also use forged documents to convince victims they are speaking to a real person.

While the scams are as old as the Internet, there seems to be no shortage of victims, and little or no policing or fraud prevention on the Web by social media sites. User are simply left to fend for themselves.

But like any endeavor, the old adage should apply. If it seems too good to be true, then it probably is.

Let us know your thoughts and be sure to follow IM on Twitter for the latest culture news.


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