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Pussy Riot Rips Power, Corruption, Greed in Bad Apples Video (Watch!)

Pussy Riot Rips Power, Corruption, Greed in Bad Apples Video (Watch!) 1

Nadya Tolokonnikova, a founding member of the Russian band Pussy Riot, chops her way through some bad apples. (Photo: ScreenCap)

Pussy Riot, the Russian punk-rock band that has become an international symbol of resistance against oligarchy, greed and corruption, serves another call to action in its new video for power-rock anthem “Bad Apples.”

Pussy Riot Rips Power, Corruption, Greed in Bad Apples Video (Watch!) 2

Nadya Tolokonnikova, a founding member of Russian punk rock protest band Pussy Riot, says Putin and Trump threaten Democracy. (Photo: ScreenCap)

The band, made up of a rotating cast of seven members, was most relevant in its homeland of Russia under Vladimir Putin. But with the rise of Donald Trump and right-wing fascism, it’s message is resonating around the world.

Pussy Riot also casts a long shadow over the American music scene, which has largely devolved into homogenized pop music princesses. It long ago lost its roots in protest songs that made rock and roll popular in the ’50s and ’60s.

But Pussy Riot is no throw-back. It’s sound is a contemporary mash-up of punk, rock and dance. It’s message, however, is universal.

“I don’t want [Trump’s] rhetoric to be acceptable in America and to influence the rest of the world,” bandmember and spokeswoman Nadya Tolokonnikova tells Rolling Stone.

With lyrics like the following, you get the picture quickly.

Dumb fools, drunk of power
Dirty thieves, tiny covers
You wouldn’t act like this in front of your kids
No
You wouldn’t act like kids in front of your kids
No

The band paired with Dave Sitek, an American musician and record producer, known for his band TV on the Radio.

“Hope you are not going to like our new track, since it’s dedicated to really disgusting things,” the band wrote. “Hope you will turn it off, go out and act.”

Speaking of wake up calls, Pussy Riot also has a message for other artists who write songs “circling around romantic feelings and Friday parties.”

Where are the songs about “climate change, gun control and sexism,” it asks.

“We’re forced to experience [state violence] and think about [it] every day,” says the group referencing its Russian roots. “That’s why almost all our our tracks are about bad apples.”

Check out the video below.

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