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Trump Legacy as ‘Massacre President’ Jumps in Wake of California Mass Shooting

Thousand Oaks Shooting scene

Police gather outside a California bar, the scene of the latest mass shooting last night. (Photo: ScreenCap)

Donald Trump’s claim to be a “law and order” president was rebuked, again, today (Nov. 8) after another mass shooting left 13 people dead and others wounded, cementing Trump’s legacy as the “massacre president.”

In the latest incident, a shooter identified as Ian David Long, 28, walked up to the Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks, Calif., and shot a security guard standing outside, according to the local sheriff’s office.

Donald Trump is firmly in the grip of the National Rifle Association (NRA) (Photo: Getty)

Long then walked into the bar and opened fire, killing 12 and wounding several others. Long also exchanged gunfire with Ventura County Deputy Sheriff Sgt. Ron Helus, who was killed, and a California Highway Patrol officer before killing himself, police said.

Long was armed with a .45-calibre handgun with an extended magazine to hold extra bullets, which is illegal in California. Magazines are limited to 10 bullets.

Last month, 11 people were killed and seven wounded during a mass shooting at Tree of Life – Or L’Simcha Congregation in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The sole suspect is Robert Gregory Bowers. a hard-right Trump support and rabid anti-Semite.

Six months ago gunfire at Santa Fe High School in Texas followed by three months a high school massacre in Parkland, Fla. In all, 17 students and staff members were killed there. Eight people were killed in Texas.

Trump talked at the time about cracking down on gun violence, but never acted. The Republican-controlled Congress also did nothing, despite a national outcry.

In the latest midterm elections, however, Democrats have taken over control of the House of Representatives with sweeping victories unseating Republicans across the country.

The National Rifle Association (NRA), which largely represents gunmakers and has opposed a number of effective gun control measures, spent $30 million to support Trump during the 2016 election, more than any other presidential candidate in the organization’s history.

The NRA is now under investigation for allegedly funneling money from Russian sources into Trump’s campaign.

Trump offered his usual “condolences” after the Texas shooting and nothing more.

“This business has been going on for too long in our country,” Trump said. “We grieve for the terrible loss of life.”

In the wake the Parkland shooting, Trump backed off promises to curb gun violence after pressure from the NRA. He recently spoke before the group’s convention.

IM reported last year that the number of mass shootings since Trump’s election is the highest in a decade. His administration is on a pace to become one of the bloodiest in modern political history.

So far this year, there have been 307 mass shooting incidents as of Oct. 27, according to the Gun Violence Archive. That comes on top of 346 mass shootings last year, Trump’s first in office.

A mass shooting is defined as four or more shot and/or killed in a single event at the same general time and location, not including the shooter, according to the group.

The Texas shooting proved that state’s with the least restrictive gun laws are particularly vulnerable to mass shootings. Texas gun laws are particularly lax.

Texas has no laws regarding possession of any firearm regardless of age. Barring a felony conviction, all existing restrictions there are no other restrictions.

The suspected Santa Fe High School shooters is a 17-year-old male, police said.

Texas residents can openly carry a handgun in a hip or shoulder holster. Gov. Greg Abbott signed the open carry bill into law in June 2016, allowing anyone with a concealed-handgun license to carry a loaded weapon in public.

California’s gun-control laws, already among the strictest in the nation, will get even tougher next year when the state bans rapid-fire “bump stocks” and sales of rifles and shotguns to people under 21, according to The San Francisco Chronicle.

Nearly a quarter million school children have been exposed to gun violence in schools since the Columbine High School massacre in 1999, according to a Washington Post analysis.

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